Учебное пособие к домашнему чтению по комедии Дж. Б. Шоу Пигмалион - файл n1.doc

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УЧЕБНОЕ ПОСОБИЕ

к домашнему чтению

по комедии Дж. Б. Шоу “ПИГМАЛИОН”

для студентов II курса

факультета иностранных языков

CONTENTS


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE……………………………………………………

3

ASSIGNMENTS TO THE PREFACE………………………………………..

7

ASSIGNMENTS TO THE COMEDY BY G. B. SHAW “PYGMALION”….

8

Assignments to Act I…………………………………………………………..

8

Unit 1…………………………………………………………………………..

8

Assignments to Act II………………………………………………………….

11

Unit 2…………………………………………………………………………..

11

Unit 3…………………………………………………………………………..

13

Unit 4…………………………………………………………………………..

15

Unit 5…………………………………………………………………………..

17

Assignments to Act III…………………………………………………………

20

Unit 6…………………………………………………………………………..

20

Unit 7…………………………………………………………………………..

22

Unit 8…………………………………………………………………………..

24

Assignments to Act IV………………………………………………………...

26

Unit 9…………………………………………………………………………..

26

Assignments to Act V…………………………………………………………

28

Unit 10…………………………………………………………………………

28

BIBLIOGRAPHY……………………………………………………………..

30

APPENDIX 1…………………………………………………………….

31



1. Read the following biographical note:
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) – Irish critic, pamphleteer and playwright, was born in Dublin on July 26, 1856, in an Irish gentry family.

Bernard grew up wild, his father being preoccupied with a declining business, his mother devoted to musical interests. Tutored in the classics by his uncle, a Dublin vicar, at the age of ten Shaw entered the Wesleyan Connexional School, and after a brief meteoric flight to the top, quickly declined and remained “generally at or near the bottom of his classes”. In three other schools which he subsequently attended, he found he could learn nothing in which he was not interested, and consequently “took refuge in idleness”. Algebra obfuscated him, the classics left him cold, but he excelled in English composition. The vital interests of this pert, voluble and athletically tireless boy were literature, music and the graphic arts.

His first lessons in music Bernard received from his mother who had a pure mezzo soprano voice. As a lad he sang to himself and before he was 15 “he knew at least one important work by Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Rossini, Bellini, Donizetti, Verdi and Gounod from cover to cover”. He scribbled with coloured crayons, attended the School of Design, haunted the National Gallery of Ireland and studied the works of the old masters. In a word, at 15 he was an unusually matured, self-educated lad.

Starting his career as an office boy and later a cashier, he submitted to magazines and newspapers numerous literary contributions which were invariably rejected. In 1876 Bernard suddenly resigned his position to accompany his mother and sisters to London, irresistibly impelled by two desires: to find his vocation and never again to do another “honest day’s work”. During the London period Shaw remained an incorrigible unemployable, being supported by his parents and earning by his pen an average of only a cent a day. Only confidence in his own powers and belief that he belonged in the company of the immortals enabled him to arise above one of the most devastating initial failures in literary history. Though he persisted in his attempt to write fiction, his first novel Immaturity remained unpublished and the following four (An Unsocial Socialist, Cashel Byron’s Profession, The Irrational Knot, Love Among the Artists) failed because of their immature criticism of Victorian respectability and morality.

On joining in 1879 a discussion club Shaw was launched upon one of the most extraordinary careers as expository orator and spellbinder transforming himself from a timid novice into a master of the platform speaking in occasional and public debates. In 1882 occurred Shaw’s historic conversion to Socialism which resulted in his close association with many social reformers and membership in the Fabian society – a revolting sect from the Fellowship of the New Life founded by the Utopian philosopher Thomas Davidson. In this sort of people’s university Shaw performed Herculean labours in committee work, drafting tracts, editing books, carrying on with rare dialectical skill innumerable discussions in the press on many topical issues. As a Progressive candidate for a seat on the London County council in 1903, Shaw was overwhelmingly defeated because of his irresistible outspokenness.

After serving on The World, The Scots Observer, The Daily Chronicle, The Pall Mall Gazette as critic of art, literature, music and drama Shaw became a music critic on The Star with the curious pseudonym – “Corno di Bassetto”, a musical instrument which went out of use in Mozart’s time. His most exciting era of critical propaganda was marked by a one-man crusade on behalf of Ibsen and the new drama (The Quintessence of Ibsenism, The Sanity of Art, The Perfect Wagnerite). In 1898, after recovering from a nervous breakdown, Shaw was married to Charlotte Payne-Townshend, an Irish heiress.

Shaw’s career as a dramatist covers a period (1885 – 1939) of more than Shakespeare’s entire life span. His plays – scandalizing WidowersHouses (1892) followed by The Philanderer (1893) – a play on Ibsenism and the “new woman”, and Mrs Warren’s Profession (1893) a daring exposure of modern commercial prostitution – gained the reputation of “unpleasant plays”, in contrast to the successive “pleasant ones”. Shaw’s American productions enhanced his reputation as a popular entertainer and rendered him financially independent; successful staging of Arms and the Man (1894), The Devil’s Disciple (1897), The Man of Destiny, Candida and others gave Shaw continental vogue; by 1915 he was being played worldwide, from Britain to Japan. He was awarded the 1925 Nobel Prize for Literature (7,000 L) which he gave to establish the Anglo-Swedish alliance for spreading a knowledge of Swedish literature in English-speaking countries.

During the period of his active dramatic composition (1893-1939) Shaw wrote 47 plays, an average of a play a year. Despite offers, he allowed the filming of only a few of his plays, the most notable being Pygmalion (1913). He was the first economist in history to win fame as a dramatist. His characters are less individualized human beings than types, intellectual abstractions bearing the verisimilitude to reality. Many of the plays are not dramas in the classic sense, but moralities, presenting the clashing ideas and conflicting ideologies of the epoch.

Shaw takes Shakespeare to task for having no message for his age. Every Shaw play is a message to the times, a testament of faith: Candida on love as pity, Man and Superman on eugenics and race betterment, Major Barbara on poverty, Androcles and the Lion on the nature of religious faith, The Doctor’s Dilemma on the parlous state of the medical profession, John Bull’s Other Island on the political contrasts of England and Ireland, Saint Joan on heroism and saintliness, Heartbreak House on World War I, Caesar and Cleopatra on genius and greatness. Shaw is primarily interested, not in events, but in people’s reactions thereto; and many of his plays are dramas of conversion: the death of old, the birth of new, faiths.

Shaw created a novel type of debated drama spreading discussion and controversy throughout the entire play, and disarmed the critics by calling his play conversations, arguments and debates. Some of his plays resemble light Mozartian operas; others – period pieces and chronicle plays – are actually historical extravaganzas (Caesar and Cleopatra, The Apple Cart, The Six of Calais, In Good King Charles s Golden Days).

His basic philosophy was fully expounded in Back to Methuselah (1921). For Shaw as a philosopher God is identified with the Life Force (elan vital) and is seen as the continuous evolution of the Universe. Shaw opens up the prospect of man’s ultimate redemption from the bondage of the flesh. Man, as expression of God, must will his own destiny.

(After The Encyclopedia Britannica)
2. State the meanings of the following words and provide their Russian/Ukrainian equivalents:


gentry, n

vicar, n

decline, v

obfuscate, v

subsequently, adv

pert, adj

voluble, adj

impel, v

incorrigible, adj

devastating, adj

revolting, adj

novice, n

outspokenness, n

crusade, n

vogue, n

verisimilitude, n

extravaganza, n


3. Provide the Russian/Ukrainian equivalents of the following set-expressions and make up sentences for translation with them:
to be preoccupied with smth.

to take refuge in smth.

to excel in smth.

to leave smb. cold

from cover to cover

to resign one’s position

to persist in one’s attempt to do smth.

to go out of use

a daring exposure of smth.

to gain the reputation of smb.
4. On the basis of the biographical note answer the following questions:
1. Describe G.B. Shaw’s family background.

2. To your mind, what circumstances of G.B. Shaw’s childhood created the necessary prerequisites for his becoming a man of letters?

3. What personal qualities did the young Shaw possess?

4. Which of them helped him succeed against the odds?

5. Dwell upon the main stages of G.B. Shaw’s literary career.

6. Describe the works comprising G.B. Shaw’s literary heritage.

5. Complete the following quotations by G.B. Shaw with a word or a phrase and then compare them with the original quotes:
QUOTES by GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
1. It is most unwise for people in love to ………………………..… ……… .

2. Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on ………………… .

3. He who can, does. He who cannot, ……………………………………... .

(Man and Superman (1903), “Maxims for Revolutionists”)

4. …………… is the root of all evil.

5. Alcohol is ………………………………………………………….… .

6. A fashion is nothing but a(n) …………………………………………. .

7. There is only one ……………..…, though there are a hundred versions of it.

(Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant (1898))

8. Take care to get what you like or you will be forced to ……………………………………………………………………..….. .

(Man and Superman (1903), “Maxims for Revolutionists”)

9. All great truths begin as ………………………………………….......... .

ASSIGNMENTS TO THE PREFACE

1. Work on the vocabulary of the preface. Learn all the unknown words and set-expressions.

2. Say if you agree with the following two maxims:

The English have no respect for their language, and will not teach their children to speak it.

It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman despise him.

3. Are they still true to life nowadays?

4. Can you draw a parallel between the English language of Shaw’s time and the Ukrainian language of today?

The reformer we need most today is an energetic enthusiast: that’s why I have made such a one a hero of a popular play.

5. To your mind, can the first part of this statement be applied to our reality (political, social etc.)?

6. If you were to write a popular play, who would be is hero?

7. What is the aim of Pygmalion, according to B. Shaw? Do you agree that great art can never be anything else as didactic?
ASSIGNMENTS TO THE COMEDY

by G.B. Shaw “PYGMALION”

Assignments to Act I

Unit 1

1. Study the following fixed phrases. What feelings and emotions do they express and what is the sphere of their usage?

It isn’t my fault. Nothing of the sort. The idea of it! Spare me that! There, there. There’s a good girl! You ought to be ashamed of yourself! I take my Bible oath that... Bly me!

2. Learn the phraseological units and provide their Russian equivalents:

to run for shelter, to get chilled to the bone, to leave much to be desired, next to nothing, to be unable to get smth for love or money, to mean no harm, to lay a charge against smb, to take liberties with smb, to have no truck with smb, to be out of patience, to push one’s way, to keep one’s remarks to oneself, to say smth out loud, to take away one’s character, out of hearing, to mind one’s own business, to pass smb off as, want of charity, to sit up in bed, to grudge every penny.

3. Analyze the structure of the emphatic constructions used in the play and make up sentences of your own according to the model:

1. What on earth is Freddy doing?

2. What a devil of a name!

3. What on earth is all that fuss about?

4. What on earth will she want with money?

5. What in thunder are we quarreling about?

4. Find synonyms for the following words:

to peer, to dash off, to pray, pigeon, feeble, damp, pane, to mend, brogue.
5. The author makes an extensive use of bookish and colloquial words. Study the list below and provide the neutral equivalents for:

frantically, reluctantly, amiable, to retreat, to subside, tittering, to meddle, impertinent, uproarious, piercing, to cease, detestable, to squash, to incarnate, jaw, to rebuke, dazedly, tenant, prodigal, to appall, to repudiate, deprecation, to tickle, Pharisaic.

6. Name all the characters introduced by the author and say a few words about each of them (clothes, manners, language).

7. Comment upon the family scene. Why are both ladies disappointed at Frreddy’s behaviour? Who do you think is “the hub of the Universe” in the family? Who is hen-pecked?

8. Render the flower girl’s talk to the lady into indirect speech. Mind that:

the verbs “to say”, “to tell”, “to explain”, “to speak”, “to talk”, “to answer”, “to reply” are used for statements;

the verbs “to ask”, “to question”, “to wonder” for questions;

the verbs “to disagree with”, “to deny”, “to refuse”, “to contradict”, “to object to” for negations;

the verbs “to persuade”, “to ask”, “to tell”, “to order”, “to advise”, “to invite”, “to urge”, “to recommend” for commands, requests, orders.

Try to use as many verbs from the list as possible.

Start like this: Mother wondered how the flower-girl had learned her son’s name was Freddy. But her daughter...

9. Explain the reason for the scandal. What was the flower-girl suspected of? What was the note-taker accused of? How did the mob react to the note-taker’s diagnoses? Retell the episode as if you were: the flower-girl; the bystander; the note-taker.

10. Study the flower-girl’s Cockney speech and comment upon its peculiarities, supplying your commentary with the examples:

1) phonetical (the dropping of initial H-sounds where they should be pronounced, replacement of diphthongs [h] by [e], [a]and [] by [:], retraction of vowel sounds, etc);

2) grammatical (usage of double or multiple negation, usage of past tense instead of the past participle in the perfect tenses, form “amn't” functioning as “am not”, “is not”, “are not”);

3) lexical (slang and specific forms of address). Find the neutral English substitutes for the following Cockney words and expressions: bloke, to buy off smb, to holler, shut your head, tec, copper’s nark, busy-body, toff, blooming, blessed, duchess, garn! (go on!)

Can you think of the corresponding equivalents in the Russian slang?
10. Dwell upon the circumstances of the meeting of two famous linguists. Explain and expand:

1) Happy is the man who can make a living by his hobby.

2) People give themselves away every time they open their mouths.

3) Remember that your native language is the language of Shakespeare and Milton and The Bible.

4) Her kerbstone English will keep her in the gutter to the end of her days.

12. Study the description of the interior of Eliza’s room. In what way is it suggestive?

13. Read the following description of a London market and make a conclusion about the poor flower-girl’s way of life:

Billingsgate Market

Just down the Thames from London Bridge is Billingsgate Market, which has become synonymous for fish and picturesque language. It is said to be London’s oldest market and there is even a claim that it originated in the ninth century. Originally fish for London arrived by water at Billingsgate Wharf, but now most of it comes overland. Activity in the market begins about 5 a.m. and something like a thousand tons of fish are handled daily. The white-coated fish porters wear curiously shaped hats made of leather that appear to be somewhat similar to the helmets worn by the bowmen of medieval England. The language they are reputed to use was famous even in Shakespeare’s time, for he makes the Messenger in “King Lear” refer to “As bad a tongue, if it be set on, as an oyster-wife at Billingsgate hath”.

14. Some locations mentioned in the text are marked on London map (Приложение 1):

Covent Garden, Charing Cross, Ludgate Circus, Trafalgar Square, Hammersmith, Strand, Selsey, Lisson Grove, Hoxton, Cheltenham, Harrow, Cambridge, Earlscourt, Epsom, Hanwell, Kentish Town, Park Lane, Buckingham Palace, Chelsea, Battersea Park.

Find as many as you can.

Assignments toAct II

Unit 2

1. Learn the following word-combinations and find the suitable Russian equivalents:

at right angles, a man of forty or thereabouts, to take notice, to keер (a child) out of mischief, to be in a good humour, to fancy oneself, a common girl, to take an interest in smth, a bit of luck, to be no use, to come back to business, to mistake smth for smth, to give smb trouble, to turn one’s head.

2. Paraphrase the following colloquial sentences and remember the context where they have been used:

I’m quite done up for today. It’s for you to say. Do as you are told. Take it or leave it. Be off with you! He isn’t above giving lessons. You’d had a drop in, hadn’t you? I don’t mind if I do. It serves you right!

3. Explain and expand:

What is life but a series of inspired follies?

There are more ways than one of turning a girl’s head.

4. Study the nonsense rhyme. What is the seeming paradox of the rhyme based on? Learn it by heart.

5. In the author’s remarks the reader can trace a great amount of various adverbs expressing subtle nuances of human feelings and manners. Study the list below, practice the correct pronunciation and give the Russian translation for each item. Can you find any synonyms (antonyms) among them?

Violently, hastily, uproariously, genially, suspiciously, haughtily, angrily, explosively, eagerly, solemnly, dazedly, wearily, peremptorily, coyly, gravely, confidentially, brusquely, gently, severely, helplessly, loudly, courteously.

6. Comment on the usage of “why” as an interjection in the emphatic sentence:

Why, this is the girl I jotted down last night.

Think of the possible ways to translate the following sentences:

Why, can that be Smith?

Why, it’s already midnight!

What is twice two?—Why, four. Why, a child could answer the question.

Can I be there at 11 sharp? Why, I think so.

Why, what is wrong about that?

If we miss the train, why, we must wait for the next one.

7. Eliza’s speech is remarkable for numerous deviations from grammar rules: usage of “was” instead of “were” in IF-clauses, usage of Passive Voice instead of Present Perfect, multiple negations, etc. Support the statement with examples from the play.

8. Study the description of Higgins’s laboratory. What are the functions of the following items?

Phonograph with wax cylinders, laryngoscope, file cabinet, tuning-fork, life-size image of human head.

9. Retell the chapter after the given plan:

1. Talking shop on phonetics.

2. Eliza’s unexpected visit to Higgins’s place.

3. A “business offer” and the way Higgins considered it.

4. Conditions of the bet between Pickering and Higgins.

10. In what way can a shilling be equivalent to 70 guineas?

Remember the British monetary system: penny (pl. pence) = the 12th part of a shilling; 20 shillings make up a pound sterling; guinea – a gold coin of Great Britain with a nominal value of 20 shillings; sovereign – a gold coin of the United Kingdom equal to one pound sterling; crown – a silver coin equal to five shillings.

How much does Eliza earn daily? What is her rent for the flat? How much is she ready to pay for her lessons of Received Pronunciation? Compare that with millionaire’s incomes and expenses. Give the gist of the episode as if you were: Eliza, Mrs Pearce, Pickering, Higgins.
Unit 3

1. Phraseological units and word-combinations to be memorized:

to walk over people, not to have the slightest intention of doing smth, to earn one’s own living, to keep to the point, to look ahead, to live on smth, to put smth plainly and fairly, to speak to smb in private, to take charge of smb, to answer back, to catch one’s death
2. Find the Standard English equivalents for the following Cockney words and expressions:

to chuck, to come off smth, to be off one’s chump, a balmy

3. Group the following words according to their meaning:

coarse, put out, neglected, reward, beat, mean, toss, calculate, degraded, solve, ascertain, thrash, slatternly, eject, turn out, dirty, return, vulgar, figure out, unkempt, frowzy, wallop, low, chuck, expel, throw

4. What is Eliza’s ambition in life? What scenes of high life does Higgins picture to “seduce” Eliza?

5. Explain and expand the original context:

1. Does it occur to you, Higgins, that the girl has some feelings?

2. Time enough to think of the future when you haven’t any future to think of.

3. He is made of iron, that man.

6. Dwell upon the following episodes:

1. Mrs Pearce speaks on the conditions of Eliza’s stay in their house;

2. the girl’s reaction to bathing.

What modal verbs are made use of here?

7. Act II is rich in words and expressions concerned with the process of bathing. Find the English equivalents for the following:

котел, краны с холодной и горячей водой, завернуться в халат, нижнее белье, ночная рубашка, наполнять ванну, соли для ванны, душистое мыло, грелка в постель, щетка-скребок.

Can you add any more bath items to the list? Describe your own bathing procedure.

8. Provide prose translation of the given passages from the rhyme “Wash’em white” (“Moydodyr”) by Korney Chuhovsky:

Как пустился я по улице бежать!

Прибежал я к умывальнику опять.

Мылом, мылом,

Мылом, мылом

Умывался без конца,

Смыл и ваксу,

И чернила

С неумытого лица.
Надо, надо умываться

По утрам и вечерам,

А нечистым

Трубочистам –

Стыд и срам!

Стыд и срам!
Да здравствует мыло душистое,

И полотенце пушистое,

И зубной порошок,

И густой гребешок!

Unit 4
1. Learn the following word-combinations and remember the context where they have been used:

to have it out with smb, a confirmed old bachelor, to drive at smth, to take an advantage of smb’s position, to keep smth as a curiosity, to be particular about smth, to be in the way, to learn smth at mother’s knee, to charge smb with doing smth, to choose to do smth, to call one’s attention to smth, to account for smth.

2. Match the given English adverbs with their Russian equivalents:

deftly

неумолимо

moodily

пристально

dogmatically

торжественно

restlessly

негодующе

gravely

бесстрастно

eagerly

надменно

sternly

убежденно

indignantly

неряшливо

stolidly

с судейским видом

emphatically

бесконечно

loftily

выразительно

uneasily

угрюмо

steadfastly

ловко

solemnly

быстро

immensely

безапелляционно

promptly

угрожающе

confidently

благодарно

menacingly

мрачно

slovenly

взволнованно

magisterially

беспокойно

appreciatively

серьезно


3. Translate into English:

1) Женщина хочет жить своей жизнью, а мужчина – своей; и каждый старается свести другого с правильного пути.

2) В присутствии этой девушки я просила бы Вас быть очень осмотрительным в выборе выражений.

3) Берегите пенсы, а уж фунты сами себя сберегут.

3) Элиза имела дерзость заявиться в мой дом и потребовать, чтобы я выучил ее правильно говорить по-английски, иначе она не сможет получить места продавщицы в цветочном магазине.

4) Мне очень приятно видеть, что в Вас сохранилась искра родительского чувства.

5) Не такой я человек, чтобы становиться собственной дочке поперек дороги.

4. Explain the double meaning of the question: “Are you a man of good character where women are concerned?” Why do Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering misunderstand each other?

5. Comment upon Mrs Pearce’s idea of proper language. What vulgar expressions are included into her list of don’ts? What are their Russian equivalents?

6. What does Mrs Pearce mean by good manners? Remember the cases proving that Higgins fails to obey the social rules.

7. “Mrs Pearce. Only this morning, sir, you applied this word to your boots, to the butter, and to the brown bread.

Higgins. Oh, that! Mere alliteration, natural to a poet”.

Find the definition of the stylistic device of alliteration and examples of its usage (of your own choice). Explain the essence and effect of alliteration in the following lines:

***

And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain

Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before...

(Poe E.A. The Raven)

***

We are the music-makers,

And we are the dreamers of dreams,

Wandering by lone sea-breakers,

And sitting by desolate streams;

World-losers and world-forsakers,

On whom the pale moon gleams.

Yet we are the movers and shakers

Of the world forever, it seems.

(A.W.E. O’Shaughnessy)

***

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,

The flying cloud, the frosty light... (Tennyson A. In Memoriam)

Unit 5
1. Learn the following word-combinations, give their Russian equivalents and remember the context they have been used in:

to wash one’s hands of smth, to be a man of the world, to take smb up, to do smth double-quick, to stand in smb’s light, come this way, to take a fancy to smb, to be set on smth, to have (get, take) the floor, to mean no harm, to be worth one’s keep, by the sweat of one’s brow, to be game for anything, to live idle, to have the heart to do smth, to draw the line at smth, to have a good mind to do smth, a slip of the tongue, to cut old friends, to try smth on, to do smth at the first shot.
2. Study the exclamations below and explain their origin and usage:

Bly me! By Jupiter! By Jove! By George!
3. Render into English:

1) Ведь если на Элизу посмотреть как на молодую женщину, тут плохого не скажешь – девчонка что надо! Но как дочь она не стоит своих харчей – говорю вам откровенно.

2) Если бы у него были дурные намерения, я бы спросил 50 фунтов.

3) Чувство морали мне не по карману, хозяин.

4) Если бы мы поработали над этим человеком три месяца, он мог бы выбирать между министерским креслом и кафедрой проповедника в Уэльсе. 5) Если мы еще минуту послушаем его, у нас не останется ни одного непоколебленного убеждения.

6) Отец заговаривает людям зубы и перекачивает денежки из чужих карманов в свой.

7) Нелегкое дело мы с вами затеяли, полковник Пикеринг.
4. What was the aim of Doolittle’s visit to Wimpole Street? Render it as if you were:

1. Eliza’s father;

2. Professor Higgins;

3. Eliza.
5. Explain the notion of “rhetoric” (elocution). How can you prove Alfred Doolittle was a born elocutionist? Find examples of rhetorical questions, reiterations, parallel constructions, emphatical sentences in his speech.
6. Explain and expand:

1) I am one of the undeserving poor, up against middle class morality all the time.

2) She’ll soon pick up your free and easy ways.

3) You won’t see the old liar again in a hurry.

4) This unfortunate animal has been locked up for 9 years in school to teach her to speak and read the language of Shakespeare and Milton.

7. What is understood by “snobbery”? Remember examples of snobbery from the classical literature.

8. Describe Eliza’s first lesson in phonetics. Can your remember yours?

9. Watch the corresponding episode from the film “My Fair Lady” and put down the patterns Eliza was to learn. Practice some of the following tongue-twisters yourselves:

***

Swan swam over the sea.

Swim, swan, swim.

Swan swam back again.

Well swam, swan!

***

She sells seashells on the seashore.

The shells she sells are seashells, I’m sure.

So if she sells seashells on the seashore

Then I’m sure she sells seashore shells.

***

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper.

A peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper picked.

If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper

Where’s the peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper picked?

***

A thatcher of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a-thatching:

Did a thatcher of Thatchwood go to Thatchet a-thatching?

If a thatcher of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a-thatching,

Where’s the thatching the thatcher of Thatchwood has thatched?

***

Little Lady Lilly lost her lovely locket.

Lucky little Lucy found the lovely locket,

Lovely little locket lay in Lucy’s pocket –

Lazy little Lucy lost the lovely locket!

***

When the Twister twists me a twist,

The twisting of his twist he three times does untwist;

And if one of the twines of his twist does untwist,

The twine that untwisted, untwists the whole twist.

Assignments to Act III

Unit 6

1. Learn the following expressions and remember their original context:

to give access to smth (smb), brought up on smth, to take the trouble to do smth, to be within reach of one’s hand, to do smth on purpose, a love affair, to win a bet, to be (feel) at home, to be the life and soul of smth, to take up the cue, to stand on tiptoe, Lord forbid!
2. Provide synonyms for the words and word-combinations given below:

1) shorthand, settee, parlour, solecism, drearily, to sling, soiree, amour, deuce;

2) to mean to do smth, don’t you fuss, no use doing smth, to do smth double quick, to break up the whole show, to get round smth, not to have the ghost of a notion about smth.
3. Explain the meaning of the following notions:

1) at-home day (to be at home);

2) small talk (to have small talk):

3) Royal Society’s soirees;

4) to be eligible matrimonially;

5) She’s getting on like a house on fire.
4. Render into English:

1) Самой миссис Хиггинс уже за шестьдесят, и она давно избавила себя от хлопотливого труда одеваться не по моде.

2) Ты отпугиваешь всех моих знакомых: встретившись с тобой, они перестают у нас бывать.

3) Есть привычки, слишком глубоко укоренившиеся, чтобы их можно было изменить.

4) Я уже не первый месяц работаю над Элизой, и она делает сногсшибательные успехи.

5) Вы пришли очень удачно: мы как раз ждем одну приятельницу, с которой хотим вас познакомить.

6) То, что люди считают себя обязанными думать, уже достаточно скверно; но от того, что они на самом деле думают, у всех волосы встали бы дыбом.

7) Предполагается, что мы культурны и цивилизованы, что мы разбираемся в поэзии, философии, искусстве, науке и пр.
5. Describe the interior of Mrs Higgins’s parlour. Compare it with the inside of her son’s room in Wimpole Street. Study the interior design and match the names and descriptions below:

William Morris

furniture designer and chair maker

Edward Burne Jones

landscape painter

James Whistler

socialist of the feelings

Cecil Lawson

American painter and etcher

Thomas Chippendale

pre-Raphaelite

Inigo Jones

Rossetti 's follower and a mystic

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

English architect active in Elizabethan time

6. How would you furnish your own guest-chamber? Describe the interior of the imaginary parlour of your dream.
7. Do you agree with Mrs Higgins that her son lacks good manners? How many solecisms can you find in the episode?

8. Compare different ways of greeting and meeting people (Mrs Higgins, Henry Higgins, the Eynsford Hills mother, daughter and Freddy). How do you usually greet and say “good-bye” to others?

Unit 7

1. Learn the given word-combinations, translate them into Russian and use them in the context of your own:

to devour smb with one’s eyes, to be about to do smth, to come to, to do smb in, to be mother’s milk to smb, to drink on the burst, that’s a mercy, to take a hint, to catch a glimpse of smth, to pitch smth in strong, to bring oneself to do smth, to be presentable, to swear like a bargee, to be cracked about smth, to have a bee in one’s bonnet about smth, to tackle a job, make no mistake about it.
2. Paraphrase Eliza’s “new small talk” in Standard English. Render her speech into Russian making use of the corresponding Russian slang.

3. Translate into English:

1) Нельзя быть такой старомодной: люди подумают, что мы нигде не бываем и никого не видим.

2) Понятия о приличии так изменились, что я порой не знаю, где нахожусь: в светской гостиной или в пароходном кубрике.

3) Если ты действительно не замечаешь, что Элиза выдает себя каждой своей фразой, значит, ты просто с ума сошел.

4) Миссис Пирс очень рада, что у нее теперь хлопот меньше: раньше ведь ей приходилось отыскивать мои вещи и напоминать мне, куда я должен идти.

5) Обучать Элизу – самая трудная работа, за какую я когда-либо брался.
4. When we mean to say that someone’s language is vulgar and dirty, we use the simile “to swear like a bargee”. A simile (pronounced sim-il-ee) is the reference to a thing or person with a specific comparison to something else. There are no limitations to what can be compared to what, but there are a lot of similes which have become cliches through over-use. Can you match the pairs from the following scrambled lists?

as dead as

a sandboy

as blind as

a whistle

as sober as

а раnсаке

as ugly as

a hatter

as pretty as

a bat

as safe as

a mule

as good as

а mouse

as stubborn as

a judge

as mad as

a dodo

as quiet as

a picture

as clean as

a lord-

as straight as

а kite

as old as

an arrow

as pleased as

the ace of spades

as happy as

two short planks

as drunk as

houses

as easy as

sin

as dull as

gold

as thick as

Punch

as high as

pie

as flat as

the hills

as slippery as

a kitten

as cool as

night and day

as regular as

hell

as hungry as

an eel

as weak as

a lamb

as keen as

a church mouse

as strong as

a fox

as proud as

a bear

as poor as

a bird

as likely as

an ox

as light as

mustard

as innocent as

not

as smart as

a peacock

as hot as

a cucumber

as free as

a feather

as different as

clockwork

as black as

ditchwater


Unit 8
1. Learn the English word-combinations, find their Russian equivalents and remember the original context:

to keep records, right off, like a shot, not to get a word in edgeways, to be to the point, to make for somewhere, to utter a word, to pay through the nose, ready? – go! to make a sensation, to be in full swing, to stick to one’s opinion, to keep an eye on smb.

2. Find the words defined by Webster’s Encyclopedic Dictionary as follows:

1) Any extremely severe or trying test, experience or trial; a primitive form of trial to determine guilt or innocence by subjecting the accused person to fire, poison, or other serious danger, the result being regarded as a divine or preternatural judgment;

2) A person who makes a first appearance in a professional career or before the public;

3) A reception room in a large house or an assembly of guests in such a room;

4) A person in habit of walking about, and often performing various other acts, while asleep;

5) Designating or pertaining to a form of marriage in which a man of high rank marries a woman of lower station with the stipulation that neither she nor her children, if any, will have any claim to his rank or property.

3. Explain and expand:

1) You take a human being and change her into a quite different human being by creating a new speech for her.

2) Speech is the deepest gulf that separates class from class and soul from soul.

3) It is the first time that frightens.

4) He can learn a language in a fortnight – a sure mark of a fool.

5) Only foreigners who have been taught to speak English as it should be spoken do it well.

4. What kind of person is Nepommuck? How does he characterize himself? Dwell upon his countenance, past contacts with Professor Higgins and his present occupation. Have you noticed any mistakes in his speech?

5. Foreign speakers of English usually betray their origin through a certain accent or by making typical mistakes. Fill in the chart and supply it with your own examples:

English mistakes

Russian (Ukrainian) speakers

German

speakers

phonetics







lexicon







grammar (morphology and syntax)







spelling







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